Working for a Better Future
May
1
1:00 PM13:00

Working for a Better Future

The world of work has changed substantially in the last 20 years. The Fourth Industrial Revolution, digitalisation, outsourcing, “gig" working and precarious employment mean that trade unions must find new ways to protect their members. Catholic Social Teaching has been influential in the past, for example Cardinal Manning's intervention in the Dockers' Strike of 1889, and more widely in Catholic majority countries. This meeting brings together expertise from trade unions, the Labour Party and the academic world to explore the contribution that this teaching can bring. The event will be held in the historic Mechanics' Institute, where the TUC held its first meeting 150 years ago. The meeting will start with a buffet lunch at 1pm for 2pm start, to conclude at 4.30pm.

Download the flyer for this event here: Flyer
 

To sign up for this event, please click the link below:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/working-for-a-better-future-tickets-43315246067

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May
16
9:00 AM09:00

Integration: Navigating Religion, Identity and Conflict

On 16 May 2018, CSTP is supporting a St. Mary’s University and Las Casas Institute series of seminars hosted by COMECE in Brussels on the much contested question of the integration of minorities, migrants, and asylum seekers. COMECE is the secretariat serving the Bishops’ Conferences of the member states of the European Union.  It is a major and respected channel for dialogue with the international civil service of the European Union, Council, Commission and Parliament.  As such its influence and work extends into 27 different countries, a multiplier effect that the CSTP can rarely achieve for issues of Catholic social justice.

The speaker on this occasion, Dame Louise Casey, is no stranger to contested issues. Her work on integration in the United Kingdom, The Casey Review: a review into Opportunity and Integration, undertaken at the request of the Cameron Conservative government, was published on 5 December 2016.  The product of extensive research, it was characteristically hard-hitting and challenging.  It seems to have been put into the “too-difficult-to-deal-with-at-the –moment” file by Prime Minister Teresa May, as nothing significant has been done by way of follow up to is recommendations by the government. Yet the questions around integration given factual underpinning in the Review, multi-culturalism good or bad, the acceptability of different approaches to gender in different cultures, what might be called British values, why certain minorities do badly at school and obtaining subsequent employment, persistent inequality through several generations, remain highly pertinent not just for the UK but for all of Europe today.  The role of religion in facilitating or hindering opportunity and integration is, of course, an important part of the debate.

For this reason the title of the seminars chosen for the day is Integration: navigating religion, identity and conflict.  The day has two sessions. The first, a lunchtime session, is designed for MEPs, EU officials, ambassadors, in short, policy makers. This will be chaired by the Rt. Honourable Ruth Kelly, a former holder of a number of key government positions in the Blair and Brown Labour governments, notably Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government and Minister for Women and Equalities.

The second and afternoon session is for NGOs, leaders of different faith communities, academics and minority leaders.  It will have Alison Phipps, Professor of Languages and Intercultural Studies from the department of Education, Glasgow University and UNESCO Chair of Refugee Integration through Languages and the Arts, and Ruth Kelly, as discussants.

It is CSTP’s hope that bringing this distinctly British experience and contribution to an issue involving all of the EU member states, the EU Council, Commission and Parliament and preoccupying many will act as a modest counter to the contemporary attempt to create a binary opposition between being European and being British.

Requests for a place at the seminar should be sent to Maud Oger, COMECE, 19, Square de Meeus, B-1050 Bruxelles, Belgium.  Telephone +322-235-05-10.  Places are limited and by invitation.

 

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Prof Martin Daunton: Time Will Tell - Thinking About Intergenerational Justice
Jun
20
4:00 PM16:00

Prof Martin Daunton: Time Will Tell - Thinking About Intergenerational Justice

This is a public lecture by Prof Martin Daunton, Professor of Economic History at the University of Cambridge. Part of a series of engagements with Catholic Social Thought and Practice, organised by the Centre for Catholic Studies in the Department of Theology and Religion.

Contact ccs.admin@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

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Launch
Jun
13
1:00 PM13:00

Launch

The Church and the Migration Crisis: UK Perspectives

The Centre for Catholic Social Thought and Practice is launching on the 13th June, 2016. This innovative new Centre links together the work of CAFOD, CSAN, Von Hügel Institute, Cambridge, Las Casas Institute, Oxford, and Durham University in the development and communication of Catholic Social Thought.

The launch will focus on the theme of “The Church and the Migration Crisis: UK Perspectives” and will be held at the CCLA headquarters in London from 1pm onwards. The day will consist of a series of workshops from 1-5.30pm on law, policy making and church accompaniment and organising. These will be led by Dr Sara Silverstri of City and Cambridge Universities, George Gabriel from Citizens UK, Dr Mark Provera from Jesuit Refugee Service, Brussels, and Dr Maria-Teresa Gil Bazo a leading academic refugee lawyer.

This will be followed by a reception and evening panel event to launch the Centre.  The panel will be introduced by Dr Anna Rowlands, Chair of the Centre, and will explore “How Should the Churches be Responding to the Current Migration and Refugee Protection Crises?” Speakers include Zrinka Bralo from Migrants Organise, Dr Joshua Ralston from Edinburgh University, Dr Mark Provera from Jesuit Refugee Services, George Gabriel from Citizens UK, Dr Maria-Teresa Gil Bazo, chaired by Sarah Teather, Director, Jesuit Refugee Service UK.

This promises to be an exciting event, featuring many of those at the forefront of thinking and action on the migration ‘crisis’

The address of the venue, CCLA, can be found here.

The programme, including information on workshops and panellists, can be found here.

The launch is being held at and supported by CCLA Investment

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